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Monosodium glutamate reduces 68Ga-PSMA-11 uptake in salivary glands and kidneys in preclinical prostate cancer model

Kevin Yang ⎜Sep 21, 2018 ⎜ Industry

INTRODUCTION: Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is an excellent prostate cancer target for theranostic applications. Many imaging agents showing high sensitivity/specificity for PSMA-expressing tissues have been developed. Some have been labeled with therapeutic radionuclides (i.e. 177Lu, 225Ac) and have had success in treating castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer. The activity administered to patients is limited by toxicity to normal organs; high uptake is observed in lacrimal glands, parotids, submandibular glands, and renal cortex. (more…)

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First-in-human study of 177Lu-EB-PSMA-617 in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

Kevin Yang ⎜Sep 12, 2018 ⎜ Industry

This first-in-human study demonstrated that 177Lu-EB-PSMA-617 had higher accumulation in mCRPC and that low imaging dose appears to be effective in treating tumors with high 68Ga-PSMA-617 uptakes. Elevated uptakes of 177Lu-EBPSMA-617 in kidneys and red bone marrow were well tolerated at the administered low dose. Further investigations with increased dose and frequency of administration are warranted. (more…)

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Single Low-Dose Injection of Evans Blue Modified PSMA-617 Radioligand Therapy Eliminates Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Positive Tumors

Kevin Yang ⎜Sep 6, 2018 ⎜ Industry

Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignant tumor in men worldwide. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a surface molecule specifically expressed by prostate tumors and has been shown to be a valid target for internal radionuclide therapy in both preclinical and clinical settings. The most common radiotherapeutic agent is the small molecule 177Lu-PSMA-617, (more…)

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PET myocardial perfusion imaging more effective than SPECT scans in detecting coronary disease

David T. Drummond ⎜Apr 6, 2018 ⎜ Industry

Key findings of the study:

  • Using PET scans instead of SPECT scans resulted in increased rates of diagnosis of severe obstructive coronary artery disease from 70 percent to 79 percent.
  • PET scans were associated with a lower incidence of invasive catheterization without identification of severe coronary artery disease (43% vs 55%). (more…)

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